Rev. Sam Shoemaker ~ His Role in Early AA part II

The following story is based completely on Sam Shoemakers own words about his experiences with the beginning of AA: Let’s get the record straight; I have always felt that Bill gave me a great deal more credit for helping to get this amazing outfit started than I should have been given. I have noticed it’s something Bill does with a …

Rev. Sam Shoemaker ~ His Role in Early AA part I

No account of AA history would be complete without including the connection between Sam Shoemaker and Bill Wilson. Shoemaker was considered to be the “American Leader” of the Oxford Group. Like AA, the Oxford Group had many pioneers but none more important than Shoemaker. This would seem logical because his church was the headquarters for the Oxford Group in America …

Relapse Explained: Slips and Human Nature

The other night I was waiting for my Saturday night meeting to begin.  Across the room, I spotted an old friend from early from the days of my early sobriety. We exchanged the normal pleasantries and he told me that he had recently relapsed. He said that he was four months sober and currently living in a sober living house. …

I’m Here…So When Do I Start Getting Happy?

My sponsor asked me to listen to the talk on “Emotional Sobriety” given by Tom B. Being just a little curious, I began to listen and began to wonder,” So why this talk?” Tom starts with describing the profound transformation that takes place in us through what he refers to as the “real learning” process. This is a permanent change …

Beyond the Fellowship

In 1938, Bill Wilson wrote the Twelve Steps for recovery.  At the time, he was simply attempting to codify the principles he and other founding members of the then-nameless society (which became Alcoholics Anonymous) had been using to stay sober.  When interviewed later by members of a Catholic diocese about the similarities between the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises and the Twelve …

The Passing of the Torch

With the passing of Sandy B. this week, I couldn’t help but think about all of the great “old-timers” that have made a lasting impression on me during my recovery.  There is certainly a sense of sadness and loss when one of our “tall poles” moves on from this world.  The amazing aspect of our organization is that when we …